Sunday, November 9, 2008

Mr Glean, AKA Passer domesticus



Introduced to Australia, and a considered a pest species, the sparrows do me a service by eating up any spilt or escaped seed from the budgies aviary. Ive named the fearless leader of the 'little brown job' troupe "Mr Glean".

Birds in Backyards' page on the Sparrow. Did you know that they are actually a finch? You can tell by the beak.

8 comments:

BetteJo said...

We have sparrows galore here, why are they considered a pest species?

Lavender said...

BetteJo You know, I think they are an introduced species in the USA too, funny that!
Well, they are a pest because they are so adaptable - they can be successful anywhere it seems. They outcompete native birds for food and nesting sites. In thier defense I can say that Aussie native birds are a fussy lot with where they will breed - but thats the way they do things here in this harsh climate.

Melanie said...

I went to the links on House sparrow because I am always curious as to why the Brits thought it necessary to bring some of these things over to Australia and I cant find a reason. All reports say it was deliberate(except wikopedia)but I cannot find the reason why. Maybe the pioneers didnt like our king parrots? too colourful? Or our Galahs.. too loud? I would love to know why if anyone does stumble accross the reason. I personally love them and think theyre the sweetest little addition to our cities.

Lavender said...

Melanie Im glad Im not the only one who wonders such things - and I think they are adorable too. In some places Ive lived they were the only birds about, so they will always be pals to me.

As for how they got here, well, that seems to be a mystery to me. BUT...
In the USA, some bright spark from the Shakespeare Society decided it would be a good idea to have all the birds mentioned in Shakespeares plays in the USA.
(Other birds imported by the same people didnt survive - but the tough as boots starling did)

So, the short answer is - people being STUPID

(Try a google of "Shakespeare Starling")

Ces said...

That bird's eye is well camouflaged.

Lavender said...

Ces Cool isnt it? And so many shades of brown - really handsome birdies :)

barkfoot said...

Sparrows have always been considered by oldenday small holders to be a friend rather than a pest. The small amount of seed taken being far outwayed by the clearance of more destructive insects on food crops. Maybe this is why they were introduced?
In my childhood, Sparrows were very common, probably the most common bird in the suburbs. Now, something (no one knows what) has wiped them out. I haven't seen one for years in fact.
Please post us some 'Sparrow seeds' so that we can grow some more...

Lavender said...

Barkfoot Ah see, that just proves Im some kind of 'throwback' LOL
I wonder whats doing in your native flock - there seems to be alot more of that sort of thing in the world of late, I hope its not bad enough to knock them out entirely!
Maybe some volunteer birds could fly over from France to rebuild the numbers - or would thier outrageous accent be a deterrent?